Our Approach

 

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The demands that our customers have in terms of personnel development are also directed at us: Not only do we undergo continuous further training, but we also follow the scientific progress and findings in the areas of didactics and pedagogy. By integrating new methodological and technical tools into our workshops, we keep them lively and up-to-date. The use of a broad spectrum of methods and employing a variety of interactive elements aims to transfer theoretical learning into practical application and thus to make learning processes sustainable. Participants of our workshops receive valuable impulses for both their professional and personal development and are motivated to further build on them.

 
 

 

Our Target Groups

 

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Suitable for PhD students as well as postdocs who want to re-position themselves or enhance their professional and personal skills, but also for career advisors in the scientific environment covering topics from professional / scientific career and personal growth.

 
The workshops can be held in German or English. Tailor-made workshops can be designed to meet the individual needs of specific target groups.

 
 

Our Formats

 

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The workshops usually take place as 1 - 2-day face-to-face workshops. Some workshops include coaching parts, webinar units or are entirely designed as interactive Online-Live-Workshops or workshops with blended learning.

 
The stipulation of learning objectives, the focus of the content and the design of the format is carried out in close consultation with our clients. This is how we ensure that our workshops are target group-specific and relevant.

Our Topics

 

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We offer workshops on career development after doctorate / postdoctorate, on leadership and management, on professionally relevant communication situations as well as on specific topics of everyday scientific life, e.g. obtaining funding.

 
Most of our workshops are tailor-made. A detailed description and/or schedule is available on request. Working languages are German or English. Here is an excerpt from our portfolio:

 

 

 

Career Development

 

 

Company World
Life scientists are often unfamiliar with business life and are usually not trained in economic thinking. They often do not know how companies create value or how different departments contribute to the economic success of a company. This lack of knowledge makes them insecure about their chances in professional fields besides research and development and is the reason why their applications for jobs outside academia are often not convincing.

 

Content

The participants gain an initial insight into the management and operational processes of companies. Using a model, they learn which steps are necessary from the development of an idea to the sale of a product. By directly "stepping into" their organizational role, the participants realize what requirements they might be confronted with in a specific job.

 

Target group

PhD students who are considering a transition to small or large companies and who would like to find out in which area/department their future job might lie.

 

Learning objectives

  • Understand the concept of business and management
  • Know various roles and functions in companies
  • Understand the correlation of personality and function
  • Setup a plan to acquire business-related competences

 

Methods

Trainer input, role play with defined roles, own research, evaluation of the role play, reflection in pairs and in plenary

 

Duration

1.5 days

 

Group size

12 participants

Unsolicited applications

Content

In this workshop, the participants will learn how to access the hidden labor market. We will talk about creative approaches to identifying employment opportunities. Sometimes it is much more promising to be well informed and develop individual strategies than to compete with many others for the same advertised position.

 

Learning objectives

  • Know where and how to look for job opportunities
  • Identify your own advantages over others
  • Find arguments why you are the right person for the job

 

Target group

Postdocs and doctoral students at the end of their doctoral studies

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Duration

1 day

Application Training

Target group

This workshop is aimed at people who are informed about possible career paths after doctoral studies, who have already considered their suitability and motivation with regard to the various career options, and who now want to actively pursue their further career path in or outside academia.

 

Content

In Part 1, the focus is on the written application. How can I convey my strengths and competencies, how can I present myself as interesting? What are the differences between a CV for science and one for industry? What to consider when writing a motivation letter?

 
Part 2 includes the preparation of application documents and a review of the documents by the trainer.

 
Part 3 is dedicated to the oral presentation. Requirements in the job interview are worked on - in theory and practice. If desired, the day can be concluded with practical exercises for the assessment center.

 

Learning objectives

  • Presentation of strengths and competencies in the resume
  • Making motivation visible in an appealing cover letter
  • Preparation for the interview

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Methods

Motivational talks, presentations, working in large and small groups, individual work, training sequences with video recordings, individual review of the resume / cover letter

 

Duration

2 days

My next career step
Short-term employment, personal reasons or the desire for a change in career are some of the reasons for a professional re-orientation.

 

Content

Looking back on previous successes enables participants to identify personal strengths and competencies. An overview of various career options outside academic research reveals options in previously ignored professional fields. Individual values, motivations, and preferences will also be taken into account to identify suitable career paths after PhD and provide clarity. Finally, the participants reflect on the next steps they should take and where they can find support.

 

Target group

Young postdocs or doctoral students in life and natural sciences or humanities and social sciences in their last year before completing their doctorate

 

Learning objectives

  • Know career options in academic and nonacademic fields
  • Understand professional and personal prerequisites for career fields
  • Analyze individual accomplishments, competencies, and strengths
  • Determine next steps on individual career path

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Duration

2 days

Setting up an own business

Content

To start with, the participants are given an insight into the possibilities of self-employment and the respective requirements including formal aspects such as legal form, social insurance and taxes.

Looking at successful examples of entrepreneurship, the principles of the business model, the basis of self-employment, are explained. The participants will learn to apply the "Business Model Canvas" as a method to experiment with their own self-employment. Ideas for this are generated together and run through in small teams under supervision. Finally, further steps to implement the ideas will be elaborated.

 

Learning objectives

  • The participants learn what it means to be self-employed
  • They will be able to evaluate decisions regarding this career option
  • They know a method for developing a business model
  • They have developed ideas and received feedback on them

 

Target group

Postdocs and doctoral students in natural sciences in the last year before completing their doctorate

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Methods

Motivational talks, presentations, work in small groups, business model canvas, creativity techniques, evaluation methods, feedback

 

Duration

1 - 2 days

 
 

 

Team-building & Leadership

 

 

Guiding graduate students
When bachelor's or master's students join the research group as new employees, doctoral students are often given the responsibility to guide and supervise them. Without formal authority or experience in guiding staff, this can be a challenging task.

 

Content

In this workshop, the participants will reflect on their role and the associated expectations between MSc students on the one hand and the group leader on the other. What can be delegated, who is responsible for the outcome? And how do different communication strategies influence the collaboration?

The participants will have the opportunity to try out different scenarios.

 

Learning objectives

  • Reflecting on one's own role and expectations of it
  • Understanding how motivation works and how to give feedback
  • Know how to decide whether a task can be delegated or better not
  • Supporting bachelor's and master's students with their final theses

 

Target group

PhD students

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Methods

Motivational talks, presentations, group work, work in pairs, individual work, drama-based exercises

 

Duration

1 day

Leading a research group
Our scientific qualification makes us experts in our field of research, but for all that I am group leader now with lots of tasks and roles that I don’t feel prepared for: Selecting and guiding personnel, power struggles and fights for resources at the institute, negotiations with third party funding agencies to name but a few.

 

Content

The first part is about guiding your own research group, the second part deals with positioning the research group. The workshop covers questions such as: How to handle difficult conversations with colleagues, staff members and superiors? What can I do to earn respect as a leader? How do I form a motivated group which allows everyone to work with utmost independence and innovation? Why do people react in such unforeseen ways?

The second part deals with the positioning of the research group and a leadership style that matches one's own personality. Topics include personnel selection, power and resource struggles, negotiations with third-party funding agencies. How do I conduct difficult conversations with colleagues, employees and superiors?

 

Topics

Part 1 "Leading my research group successfully"
  • Being assertive as a leader
  • Inner security as a leader
  • Personality types and related behavioral traits
  • Flexible leadership roles - adjusting to situations and people
  • How much distance is professional?

 
Part 2 "Positioning my research group"

  • Understanding group dynamics and "institute cultures"
  • Managing difficult conversations
  • Dealing with power games
  • Alliances, networks and allies

 

Target group

Postdocs, research group leaders

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Methods

Exercises from drama-based training, role-play, personality structures according to the Structogram® system, motivational talks, individual and group exercise, feedback

 

Duration

2 x 2 days

Acquiring leadership skills
Many young scientists will take on leadership responsibilities after completing their doctorate. However, scientific training does not prepare them adequately for these future tasks. Leadership and management skills must therefore be acquired alongside scientific training.

 

Content

In this workshop, the participants will deal with basic questions and important tools for personnel management. They will recognize which attitudes and behaviors influence the cooperation with others. They will be able to identify their own communication style and test themselves in exemplary situations.

 

Learning objectives

  • Reflect on expectations of the leadership role
  • Know current leadership theories
  • Know the most important leadership tools
  • Mastering communication challenges

 

Target group

PhD students and postdocs with little or no previous knowledge in the field of leadership

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Methods

Stimulating presentations with theoretical introductions, dramatized work, small group exercises

 

Duration

2 days

Lateral leadership
Young scientists often have to take on a leadership position without having formal leadership authority - whether working with technical staff on their own project or with peers in collaborative projects. In the research environment, they acquire technical skills and knowledge, but leading a group requires people skills - skills that are equally important for lateral leadership and for preparing for a formal leadership position.

 

Content

Participants are familiarized with the most important leadership techniques and principles. They will recognize how attitudes and behavior patterns influence cooperation with others and will be able to analyze various exemplary situations. Finally, they have the opportunity to test themselves in leadership situations.

 

Learning objectives

  • The participants will be familiar with the most important current leadership theories and requirements for a manager.
  • Know the most important HR tools (delegation, goal setting, feedback, motivation)
  • Know how to apply them
  • Reflect on their own leadership role, attitudes and behaviors
  • Understand the impact on work and communication with others
  • Get a first insight into the mechanisms of lateral leadership
  • Know how to get support from colleagues (collegial consultation)
  • Develop concepts for onboarding and offboarding research staff

 

Target group

(Post-)doctoral students

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Duration

2 days

 

Skills for Science

 

 

Scientific Presentation
The art of scientific presentation is to make complicated facts understandable and to convince the audience of one's own research results. How can you succeed in this?

 

Target group

This workshop is aimed at PhD students and postdocs who have little experience in presenting and would like to gain confidence in giving presentations in the research group and at conferences.

 

Content

The most important elements that are crucial for the success of a presentation besides the scientific content will be covered in this workshop - from conceptualization over visualization to delivery.

 

Learning objectives

  • Know how to prepare content for specific target groups
  • Understand the structure and layout of scientific presentations
  • Know visual design principles and apply them to slides or posters
  • Direct the attention of the audience
  • Use language and body language effectively
  • Know technical requirements and get tips
  • To learn to handle nervousness
  • Knowing how to deal with critical questions and disruptive factors

 

Methods

Motivational talk, exercises in pairs or small groups, work on own material, video training, feedback

 

Duration

1 - 2 days

Grant Application

Content

In this workshop, the participants learn how to proceed from an idea to an application for external funding. Regardless of whether they are applying for funding from the DFG, BMBF, EU or a foundation: The principles of a good proposal are always the same, the rest is "funding technique" and form of presentation.

 

Learning objectives

  • Understand the principles of third-party funding
  • Know how to interpret the criteria in the call for proposals
  • Write a coherent abstract/executive summary
  • Plan how to proceed after the application has been submitted

 

Target group

Doctoral students at the end of their doctorate, postdocs

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Methods

We look at various calls for proposals and plan our own application. In doing so, the participants can directly apply their particular project. Alternatively, they work on a case study.

 

Duration

2 days

Scientific Writing

Content

In the workshop, we will analyze key elements of the writing process, structure, and style of scientific texts. Participants will have the opportunity to try out their newly acquired skills directly, improve their own material in group and partner exercises, and receive valuable feedback from their colleagues. We will also address some linguistic issues.

 

Learning objectives

  • Create productive working conditions to maintain motivation during the writing process
  • Know structural components of scientific texts
  • Organize the writing process
  • Know how to find the right tone for the desired audience
  • Employ formal elements for clarity and credibility of the publication
  • Know practical solutions for cumulative dissertations
  • Apply useful web links and programs

 

Target group

This workshop is aimed at doctoral students who are starting to write their dissertations, as well as young postdocs who want to polish their scientific publications.

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Duration

2 days, if desired with one-on-one consulting sessions

 

Communication & Diversity

 

 

Deciphering gender codes
In this workshop we will discuss the different communication styles of women and men and how to transfer this knowledge into practice so that communication in the academic environment can succeed.

 

Learning objectives

  • Communication styles
  • Reflection of own communication style
  • Analysis of structural conditions and breaking of patterns
  • Dealing with provocations
  • Practice self-confident behavior

 

Target group

(Young) Scientists, Science Managers

 

Methods

Theoretical impulse, body awareness exercises, simulations from drama-based training

 

Duration

2 days

Closeness vs. distance
We often talk about a “professional distance“ that is pursued in a business context. Often, however, this is being mistaken for emotional detachment from colleagues, staff and superiors. Not only does this detachment take an immense effort, it is also often only achieved at the expense of creative potential.

 
In this seminar you will learn with the help of methods from drama-based training how to vary between closeness and distance so that it remains comfortable for yourself. We train how you can guide your own energy and release the tension in your body. In this way you will gain "inner security" and have new capacity for the factual level of the conversation.

 

Learning obejctives

  • Know the range between professional distance and closeness
  • Become more confident and relaxed in your daily work routine
  • Know how to free new potentials for the factual side of things

 

Target group

Scientists in the application process who want to gain confidence and group leaders who want to acquire a more relaxed approach in leading

 

Group size

Max. 6 participants

 

Methods

Motivational talk, individual and group work, exercises from drama-based training, role-play practicing participants’ examples, personality structures according to the Structogram® system, feedback

 

Duration

2 days, possibility of consolidation in individual coaching sessions

Conflict resolution
PhD students are often confronted with difficult situations. Conflicts can arise among colleagues, within (international) collaborations and with the supervisor. All parties involved at times have different interests - or simply a communication style that one finds challenging. This can lead to a loss of motivation and productivity of individuals and entire teams. Addressing conflicts openly, however, is not easy: PhDs may feel they are in a position of dependency or may just not want to upset anyone. Or they simply lack the knowledge of how to address conflicts.

 

Content

In this workshop, the participants will learn practical tools that enable them to address conflicts and deal with them in a constructive way. We will analyze situations of conflict in teams, in (international) cooperation and with superiors and practice resolving issues or problems between two or more people. We will take a look at individual styles of dealing with conflicts and work on how to handle even emotionally difficult situations.

The participants can bring their own examples from their working life. In a trusting atmosphere, they will have the opportunity to discuss their own issues and experience mutual support.

 

Learning objectives

  • Understand how conflicts arise and what happens if not addressed
  • Know how to represent and assert your interests
  • Address conflicts within the team and work toward a resolution
  • Employ communication tools to facilitate constructive conversations
  • Develop awareness of how different (e.g., cultural) backgrounds can influence conflicts / communication styles

 

Target group

Doctoral students

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Methods

Impulse lectures, presentations, group and small group work, individual work, drama exercises

 

Duration

2 days
Negotiation
Scientists negotiate every day - at different levels and hierarchies, within their own institution and beyond its borders, and also in their private lives. Negotiations often take place in difficult situations where feelings can be hurt and positions can harden to the point where a solution or breakthrough seems unattainable.

 

Content

The participants in this workshop will become aware of the importance of negotiation as a basis for change. They will get to know their own negotiation style and learn to gain confidence in doing so. How to prepare for and conduct negotiations will be discussed and practiced.

 

Learning objectives

  • Understand different negotiation and decision-making strategies
  • Know which approach is appropriate in a given situation
  • Think more clearly, act more wisely, and move more purposefully in the desired direction

 

Target group

Scientists and academics who want to negotiate more successfully

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Methods

Motivational talks, presentations, small and large group work, simulations and role plays, individual exercises, video clips if desired, Metalog tools

 

Duration

2 days

Diverse Teams
The globalized world brings together international, diverse teams that work together more or less successfully on projects and share workplaces. Due to different expectations and behaviors, but also due to different needs, intercultural conflicts occur time and again in this multicultural working world, costing companies, universities and organizations nerves, time and money. For project success in collaborations, it is therefore important to know about the specific cultural characteristics and to adapt individually to the respective cooperation partners or colleagues and the situation.

 

Content

To ensure a strong practical relevance to the working situation, the specific questions and examples of the participants will be included in the training whenever possible. Focal points are:

  • Dealing with stereotypes and clichés
  • Awareness of one's own and others' perceptions
  • Reflection of own cultural values and imprinting
  • Multicultural teams, countries and characteristics
  • Communication, factual and personal focus, leadership, indirect communication

 

Learning objectives

  • Acquire relevant knowledge about culture
  • Sensitivity for cultural conditionality of thinking, perceiving and acting
  • Expand behavioral repertoire for intercultural encounters
  • Develop successful strategies for action

 

Target group

PhD students, postdocs, members of the entire research group

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Methods

Motivational talks, presentations, plenary and small group work, individual exercises, Metalog tools

 

Duration

2 days

 

Management and Health

 

 

Project Management

Learning objectives

The goal of this workshop is to provide participants with a set of tools and techniques that will help them keep their projects on track and ultimately achieve their project objectives.

 

Content

To do this, they are introduced to the principles of project management and understand what it takes to run successful projects. The content is focused on the specific issues of scientific research and science management. The participants are encouraged to apply and practice the tools of project management directly in their own projects. Alternatively, work can be done on case studies.

 

Target group

Postdocs of all disciplines who want to lead complex projects and/or prepare for a career in science management.

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Methods

Theoretical input on the basics of project management with a focus on science, small group exercises, if desired with a project management software application

 

Duration

2 days
Successful to your PhD
PhD students have a lot of tasks to fulfill. In part, they are employed by the university and have to fulfill teaching obligations or supervise master's students. On the other hand, they are supposed to take care of their PhD project, which often includes learning new techniques or introducing new methods in the lab. At the same time, they take on some general tasks, such as maintaining equipment, ordering consumables, or organizing workflow. And they are expected to volunteer to organize conferences, meetings, and retreats. Finally, they must be supportive when other graduate students need their expertise.

 
This multi-dimensional task requires a lot. Setting priorities, having discipline, and being able to say "no" are just a few of them.

 

Learning objectives

  • Analyze tasks and identify time killers
  • Define own goals and steps to achieve them
  • Acquire a technique for prioritizing tasks
  • Say "no" when necessary without hurting others

 

Target group

Doctoral students, preferably at the beginning of their doctorate

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Duration

2 days

 

Individual Topics for Specific Needs

 

 

Visibility for Women
Women scientists continue to be underrepresented in both academic science and industry. They face conflicts and hurdles based on both structural conditions and individual attitudes and perceptions.

 

Content

The participants reflect on their own perception. Structural conditions are examined and male and female communication patterns are compared. They learn how to gain and project more inner strength in difficult situations with the help of their body and voice.

 
In addition, participants are provided with a range of tactics to respond appropriately to provocations and unfair behavior. They have the opportunity to practice self-confident behavior in negotiation situations, e.g. salary and promotion negotiations. Through feedback from the group, the trainer and a male counterpart, the participants can compare and adjust self-perception with external perception. In this way, they learn to use their strengths in a purposeful way and to assert themselves.

 

Learning objectives

  • Know and overcome different communication patterns
  • Reflect on self- and external perception
  • Understanding the role of structural circumstances
  • Learn to assert yourself as a woman
  • Develop strategies for difficult situations

 

Target group

Female scientists

 

Group size

Max. 10 participants

 

Methods

Activities in small groups and in plenary, drama-based exercises, role plays (voluntary), some with male counterpart

 

Duration

2 days
Zielgruppe Career Service

Zielgruppe

Die Maßnahme wendet sich an Fachkräfte, die in der Studien- und Berufsberatung für Studierende, Promovierende und Post-Doktorand*innen tätig sind oder sich auf einen solchen Karriereschritt vorbereiten wollen. Angesprochen sind sowohl Mitarbeiter und Mitarbeiterinnen, die zentral in Personal- oder Verwaltungsabteilungen tätig sind, als auch Fachkräfte, die dezentralen Einheiten wie Fachbereichen, Graduiertenschulen (-kollegs) oder anderen Organisationen zugeordnet sind.

 

Inhalt

Die Teilnehmenden erhalten Gelegenheit, sich ihrer eigenen Rolle klar zu werden und ein eigenes Selbstverständnis im Spannungsfeld zwischen organisationalen Interessen ihres Arbeitgebers und individuellen Interessen ihrer Klientel zu entwickeln. Sie reflektieren ihre Gestaltungsspielräume vor dem Hintergrund ihres Auftrags und ihrer organisatorischen Verankerung. Zusätzlich wird die Förderung der eigenen Kompetenz- und Karriereentwicklung durch Netzwerken und Weiterbildung thematisiert. Darüber hinaus besteht Raum für einen strukturierten Erfahrungsaustausch über Beratungsmethoden sowie Grenzen der Karriereberatung.

 

Lernziele

Am Ende haben die Teilnehmenden ein erstes Konzept für sich erarbeitet, aus dem hervorgeht, für was sie stehen und welche Ziele sie verfolgen.

 

Gruppengröße

Max. 12 Personen

 

Dauer

2 Tage
Success factor woman
Funding institutions increasingly look for female participation in submitted projects in order to achieve a higher percentage of women in scientific leadership positions, in science societies and in boards. Research institutions are committed to promote women, but how can this goal be set into action? Difficulties arise when PIs look for collaboration partners and only potential male partners seem to be available.

 

Content

In this workshop we will examine the reasons for the seemingly non-visibility of female scientists independent of their excellence. Structural reasons as well as different communication patterns of men and women will be discussed as well as unconscious bias. In simulation exercises the participants have the opportunity to change perspective and to adjust their perception and communication patterns with the help of feedback by the group and the trainer.

 
The insights will sensitize scientists and help them to find and attract suitable female candidates and to establish fruitful collaborations.

 

Learning objectives

  • Understand the non-scientific agendas of funding agencies
  • The "currency" of visibility in a scientific context
  • Reflect on one's own perceptions and unconscious biases
  • Understand the role of structural circumstances
  • Know how to overcome different communication patterns of the opposite sex

 

Target group

Male and female scientists

 

Group size

Max. 10 participants

 

Methods

Small group and plenary activities, drama-based exercises, role-play (voluntary)

 

Duration

2 days

 
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