Many young scientists are already confronted with leadership issues during their doctorate or postdoc period, when it comes to guiding graduate students, assistant scientists or interns. And what's more: young scientists are typically expected to take on leadership responsibilities throughout their careers, whether as head of a scientific research group at their institute, in a senior position in industry, or in science management. Regardless of whether a career is pursued in academia or in the private sector, professional success depends to a large extent on team building and interaction.

 
In the same way, not every group leader has received formal training in team leadership. How do I make sure that teamwork gets results? Which leadership style suits my personality? Where do I see development opportunities for myself or my team members? How can I stay healthy in the face of leadership responsibility?

 
These and other questions can be addressed in our workshops. Tell us, what questions you have and we tailor a workshop to your needs. For examples of leadership workshops see here:

 

 

Team-building & Leadership

 

 

Guiding graduate students
When bachelor's or master's students join the research group as new employees, doctoral students are often given the responsibility to guide and supervise them. Without formal authority or experience in guiding staff, this can be a challenging task.

 

Content

In this workshop, the participants will reflect on their role and the associated expectations between MSc students on the one hand and the group leader on the other. What can be delegated, who is responsible for the outcome? And how do different communication strategies influence the collaboration?

The participants will have the opportunity to try out different scenarios.

 

Learning objectives

  • Reflecting on one's own role and expectations of it
  • Understanding how motivation works and how to give feedback
  • Know how to decide whether a task can be delegated or better not
  • Supporting bachelor's and master's students with their final theses

 

Target group

PhD students

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Methods

Motivational talks, presentations, group work, work in pairs, individual work, drama-based exercises

 

Duration

1 day

Lateral leadership
Young scientists often have to take on a leadership position without having formal leadership authority - whether working with technical staff on their own project or with peers in collaborative projects. In the research environment, they acquire technical skills and knowledge, but leading a group requires people skills - skills that are equally important for lateral leadership and for preparing for a formal leadership position.

 

Content

Participants are familiarized with the most important leadership techniques and principles. They will recognize how attitudes and behavior patterns influence cooperation with others and will be able to analyze various exemplary situations. Finally, they have the opportunity to test themselves in leadership situations.

 

Learning objectives

  • The participants will be familiar with the most important current leadership theories and requirements for a manager.
  • Know the most important HR tools (delegation, goal setting, feedback, motivation)
  • Know how to apply them
  • Reflect on their own leadership role, attitudes and behaviors
  • Understand the impact on work and communication with others
  • Get a first insight into the mechanisms of lateral leadership
  • Know how to get support from colleagues (collegial consultation)
  • Develop concepts for onboarding and offboarding research staff

 

Target group

(Post-)doctoral students

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Duration

2 days

Acquiring leadership skills
Many young scientists will take on leadership responsibilities after completing their doctorate. However, scientific training does not prepare them adequately for these future tasks. Leadership and management skills must therefore be acquired alongside scientific training.

 

Content

In this workshop, the participants will deal with basic questions and important tools for personnel management. They will recognize which attitudes and behaviors influence the cooperation with others. They will be able to identify their own communication style and test themselves in exemplary situations.

 

Learning objectives

  • Reflect on expectations of the leadership role
  • Know current leadership theories
  • Know the most important leadership tools
  • Mastering communication challenges

 

Target group

PhD students and postdocs with little or no previous knowledge in the field of leadership

 

Group size

Max. 12 participants

 

Methods

Stimulating presentations with theoretical introductions, dramatized work, small group exercises

 

Duration

2 days


 


 
 
© KEPOS 2021 all rights reserved site by bits&pix